What to Expect the First Year Third Edition

by Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel

Author Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel Isbn 0061968730 File size 11 Mb Year 2014 Pages 373 Language English File format PDF Category Family and Friendship Some things about babies happily will never change They still arrive warm cuddly soft and smelling impossibly sweet But how moms and dads care for their brand new bundles of baby joy has changed and now so has the new baby bible Announcing the completely revised third edition of What to Expect the First Year With over 10 5 million

Publisher :

Author : Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel

ISBN : 61968730

Year : 2014

Language: English

File Size : 11 Mb

Category : Family and Friendship



WHAT TO

EXPECT
FIRST YEAR
®

THE

3RD EDITION

Also Available from What to Expect®
What to Expect® the Second Year
What to Expect® When You’re Expecting
Eating Well When You’re Expecting
What to Expect® Before You’re Expecting
The What to Expect® When You’re Expecting
Pregnancy Journal & Organizer
Qué puedes esperar® cuando estás esperando
(What to Expect® When You’re Expecting—Spanish Edition)
Qué puedes esperar® en el primero año
(What to Expect® the First Year—Spanish Edition)
The What to Expect® Baby-Sitter’s Handbook

WHAT TO

EXPECT
FIRST YEAR
®

THE

3RD EDITION

By Heidi Murkoff
and Sharon Mazel
Foreword by Mark D. Widome, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Pediatrics,
Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital, Hershey, Pennsylvania

Wo rkm a n Pub l i s hi ng • Ne w York

Copyright © 1989, 1996, 2003, 2010, 2014 by What to Expect, LLC.
Design copyright © by Workman Publishing
Front and back cover photographs © 2014 by www.mattbeard.com
Cover quilt: Lynn Parmentier; Quilt Creations, quiltcreations.net
Quilt photography: Davies + Starr
Interior illustrations: Karen Kuchar
All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced—mechanically,
electronically, or by any other means, including photocopying—without written permission
of the publisher. Published simultaneously in Canada by Thomas Allen & Son Limited.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publishing Data available upon request.
ISBN: 978-0-7611-8150-7
Workman books are available at special discount when purchased in bulk for premiums
and sales promotions as well as for fund-raising or educational use. Special editions or book
excerpts can also be created to specification. For details, contact the Special Sales Director
at the address below or send an email to [email protected]
Workman Publishing Co., Inc.
225 Varick Street
New York, NY 10014-4381
WHAT TO EXPECT is a registered trademark of What to Expect, LLC.
WORKMAN is a registered trademark of Workman Publishing Co., Inc.
Printed in the United States of America
First printing September 2014
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Note: All children are unique, and this book is not intended to substitute for the advice
of your pediatrician or other physician who should be consulted on infant matters,
especially when a baby shows any sign of illness or unusual behavior.

Dedication

To Erik, my everything
To Emma, Wyatt, and Russell, my greatest expectations
To Lennox, beautiful baby of the beautiful baby who started it all
(my sweet full circle!)
To Arlene, with so much love always and forever
To my What to Expect family—moms, dads, and babies everywhere

vi

acknowled g ments

Even More
Thanks
(and Hugs)
S

o, you’d think that by now—after
all these years of writing and rewriting What to Expect books—I’d
be able to do it by myself, in my sleep,
and (hey, why not?) with two hands tied
behind my back. Well, the sleep part—
I’ve probably done at least once or twice
on deadlines, but I’ve always needed
two hands (it’s a typing thing) and I’ve
always needed lots of help. I couldn’t
do what I do by myself—and I wouldn’t
want to try.
I owe so much to so many, but let’s
start with thanks to:
Erik, not only the man who planted
the seed for What to Expect (literally,
since he’s the father of Emma, the
baby who started it all), but the man
who’s helped me grow, nurture, nourish, and protect it—really, co-parent it.
You know how they say that the more
things change, the more they stay the
same? Plenty has changed about my life
and my life’s work since the day I delivered Emma and a proposal for What to

Expect When You’re Expecting within
just hours of each other, but there is
one thing that, lucky me, stays the same
(only consistently better): the man I
work with, live with, and love with. And
the babies we made together, Emma
and Wyatt, who long ago passed me
in height and shoe size—and, I like to
joke, in age—but who will always be my
bundles of joy (and adding to the joy,
son-in-law Russell). And of course, to
Lennox, for making me a grandmother,
and the happiest imaginable one at
that—but also for his contributions to
First Year (chief among them, being in
his first year while I was writing it). And
for being the cutest cover baby ever, and
that’s not just the grandma talking.
Always, Arlene Eisenberg, my first
partner in What to Expect and always
my most valued. Your legacy of caring and compassion continues to shape,
inform, inspire, and, of course, live on
through the next generation of What
to Expect and beyond. You will always

acknowled g ments

be loved and never be forgotten. All
my family, epecially Sandee Hathaway,
Howard Eisenberg, Abby and Norman
Murkoff, and Victor Shargai.
Sharon Mazel, for taking up the
What to Expect mission without hesitation, joining me on the third edition of
What to Expect When You’re Expecting
. . . and, thankfully, never leaving me,
even as the hours (and the indexes) got
longer. Great minds may think alike,
but few have probably thought alike
as much as we have—and that always
makes me smile, and always makes me
grateful. Thanks to you, and to Jay,
Daniella, Arianne, Kira, and Sophia,
for sharing the amazing woman who is
your wife and mom.
Suzanne Rafer, friend and editor,
one of the very few who’ve been with
me since conception—at least of What
to Expect. I don’t know if that makes
you a glutton for punishment, but I do
know it makes you an exceptionally
important person in my life. I’ve lost
count of editions and passes, but not of
the contributions you’ve made to our
babies.
Peter Workman—a publishing
giant who outgrew many office spaces
since the day I first met him, but never
outgrew his small publishing roots and
values. And everyone else at Workman
who has helped so much along the way:
Suzie Bolotin, Lisa Hollander, Beth
Levy, Barbara Peragine, Jenny Mandel,
and Emily Krasner, and all the many in
sales and marketing busy selling what
I’m writing.
Matt Beard, our favorite photographer (and one of our favorite people ever), for perfectly capturing that
Lennox essence for our cover. Lynn
Parmentier, for her quilting genius and
Karen Kuchar, for babies so beautiful
you could practically scratch and sniff

vii

their sweetness.
Dr. Mark Widome, professor, pediatrician, and fellow grandparent—not
only for knowing it all, but for being
able to dispense that knowledge with
equal doses of common sense, care,
compassion, wisdom, and good humor.
I’m more grateful than I can say for
vetting our latest baby—my only beef
being that you practice too far away to
be Lennox’s pediatrician. Happily, that
role is filled by LA’s finest, Dr. Lauren
Crosby, who has helped Lennox (and
his parents) through feeding struggles,
sepsis, slow growth, reflux, and more
with endless energy and empathy.
The AAP and pediatricians, pediatric nurses, nurse practicioners, and
physician assistants everywhere, for
caring so much about the health and
well-being of our little ones. The passionate doctors, scientists, and public
health advocates at the CDC—for absolutely everything you do, and do with
such passion and tireless dedication.
The greater good is so much better off
because of you. And 1,000 Days—for
our shared vision (together, we’ll make
it happen!): healthy moms, healthy
babies, and a healthy future that begins
before the beginning.
All of my passionate, purple-wearing friends at WhatToExpect.com,
(especially Michael Rose and Diane
Otter, Ben Wolin and Scott Wolf, the
awesome edit and product team) for
making my online and mobile home
feel, well, like home. I love working
with you, because it never feels like
work. My beautiful, sweet, nurturing
publicist and friend, Heidi Schaeffer.
And the other men in my life: my agent,
Alan Nevins, and my attorney, Marc
Chamlin.
The amazing USO, for partnering
with the What to Expect Foundation to

viii

acknowled g ments

create Special Delivery—and give me
the opportunity to hug so many military
mamas and babies.
And most of all, to the mamas
and daddies who sacrifice sleep, showers, and sit-down meals to nurture the
babies we all get to love on. You inspire
me every moment of every day. So much
love, especially, to my WhatToExpect
.com family of families, as well as my

Twitter and Facebook families (keep
those baby fixes coming!).
Big hugs,

Contents
F O R E W O R D : A New Baby Bible, by Mark D. Widome, M.D., M.P.H. . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N T R O D U C T I O N : A Very Different First Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAP TER

xix

xxiii

1

Get Ready, Get Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

Choosing Breast or Formula, or Both. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Breastfeeding • When You Can’t or Shouldn’t Breastfeed • The Breast Team •
Breastfeeding Myths • Formula Feeding • Your Feelings

Choosing to Circumcise or Not . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Diaper Decisions

Choosing a Name

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

For Parents: Preparing an Older Child

Choosing Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Baby Nurse • Help Wanted • For Parents: Prepping the Family Pet • Postpartum
Doula • Grandparents • For Parents: Running Grandparent Interference

Choosing a Baby Doctor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Health Insurance for a Healthy Family • Pediatrician or Family Practitioner?
• What Kind of Practice Is Perfect? • Finding Dr. Right • Topics to Discuss •
Making Sure Baby Dr. Right Is Right for You

CHAP TER

2

Buying for Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Buying the Baby Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
A Buyer’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Wardrobe Wise • Baby Clothes • Baby’s Linens • Diapers • The Bottom Line on
Cloth Diapers • Baby’s Grooming Supplies • The Green Scene • Baby’s Medicine
Cabinet • Baby Feeding Supplies • Feeding Chairs: As Your Baby Grows • Baby’s
Nursery • Crib Notes on Crib Safety • Bye-Bye, Bumpers • Safe Bedside Sleeping •

Double Up on Diaper Stations • Gear for Outings • Seal of Approval • Car Seat
Accessories to Skip • The LATCH System • A Place for Baby • Supervised
Seating • Buying for Baby’s Future • No Walkers Are Safe Walkers

CHAP TER

3

Breastfeeding Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Getting Started Breastfeeding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Getting the Breast Help

Breastfeeding 101. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
How Lactation Works • Getting Comfortable • Getting Into Position •
Getting the Right Latch • Sucking Versus Suckling • Knowing How Long to
Feed • Feeding Standard Time • Knowing How Often to Feed • What Type
of Nurser Is Your Baby?

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Colostrum • Milk Stages • Engorged Breasts • Let-Down • Pain During
Breastfeeding • For Parents: It Takes Three • Overabundant Milk • Leaking
and Spraying • Cluster Feedings • Sore Nipples • Inverted Nipples • Bumps on
the Road to Success? • Time Spent Breastfeeding • Mom Falling Asleep While
Nursing • Breast Milk: It’s Not Just for Breakfast Anymore • What to Wear •
Nursing in Public • Tandem Nursing • I’ll Have What He’s Having • A Breast
Lump • Mastitis • Favoring One Breast • Breastfeeding When You’re Sick •
Birth Control and the Breastfeeding Mom • Breastfeeding and Your Period •
Time to Stock Up on Tampons? • Exercise and Nursing • Combining Breast and
Bottle • Combo Amounts • Nipple Confusion Got You Confused? • When Formula
Is Necessary • Relactation/Pumping Up Supply • Banking on Milk Banks •
Breastfeeding an Adopted Baby
A L L A B O U T : Keeping Your Milk Healthy and Safe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

What You Eat • Bone Up for Breastfeeding • Can Foods Make Milk? • What You
Drink • What Medication You Take • Back on the Menu • What You Should
Avoid

CHAPTER

4

A First Year Timeline: The First Year at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . 104
You Know Your Baby Best

Developmental Milestones in the First Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
It’s Cumulative • Preemie Timing

Growth Charts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

CHAP TER

5

Your Newborn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Your Baby’s First Moments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Delayed Cord Clamping • Testing Your Baby • Apgar Test • For Babies Born at
Home • Newborn Hearing Screening • Don’t Forget to Cover Your Baby

Feeding Your Baby: Getting Started Formula Feeding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Need Help at the Breast? • Selecting a Formula • Formulas of Formula • How
Much Formula? • Bottle-Feeding Safely • Do Add-Ins Add Up? • Bottle-Feeding
Basics • Bottle-Feeding with Love • The Formula for a Happy Baby

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Birthweight • Weight Loss • Baby’s Appearance • For Parents: Meeting,
Greeting, and Bonding • Eye Ointment • Portrait of a Newborn • Bloodshot
Eyes • Eye Color • Baby’s Sleepiness • For Parents: Rooming-In • Gagging •
Empty Breasts? • Sleeping Through Meals • A Newborn State of Mind • For
Parents: Have You Heard the One . . . • Nonstop Feeding • Tips for Successful
Feeding Sessions • Cracking the Crying Code • Quivering Chin • Startling •
For Parents: Newly Delivered? • Birthmarks • Newborn Reflexes • Baby Business
• Blotchy Skin • Mouth Cysts or Spots • Early Teeth • Thrush • A Milky Tongue
• Jaundice • Stool Color • The Scoop on Newborn Poop • Pacifier Use • Going
Home • A Safe Ride Home
A L L A B O U T : Baby-Care Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

Diapering Baby • Burping Baby • Bathing Baby • Shampooing Baby • Ear Care
• Nose Care • Nail Trimming • Umbilical Stump Care • Penis Care • Dressing
Baby • Lifting and Carrying Baby • Swaddling Baby • Newborn Care, Feeding . . .
and Reading?

CHAP TER

6

The First Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Feeding Your Baby This Month: Pumping Breast Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Baby Basics at a Glance: First Month • Why Pump? • Choosing a Pump • Is
Your Pump Covered? • Preparing to Pump • Pumping Shouldn’t Hurt • Pumping
Practice Makes Perfect • How to Express Breast Milk • (Tell) Tales from the
Other Side • Where Does the Milk Go? • Storing Breast Milk • Quick Tip •
Exclusive Pumping • Breast Milk at a Glance

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
“Breaking” Baby • The Fontanels • What Month Is It, Anyway? • Having
Enough Breast Milk • Baby Getting Enough Breast Milk • Filling Out •
Supplemental Nursing System • Timing Is Everything • Tongue-Tied • Nursing
Blisters • Feeding Schedule • Double the Trouble, Double the Fun • Changing

Your Mind About Breastfeeding • Too Much Formula • Supplementary Water •
Vitamin Supplements • For Parents: Getting Everything Done • Whites,
Colors, and Baby’s? • Spitting Up • Quick Tip • Blood in Spit-up • Milk Allergy
• Sensitivities in Breastfed Babies • Bowel Movements • Explosive Bowel
Movements • Flat Out, the Best Way to Sleep • Passing Gas • Constipation •
Sleeping Position • Safe Sleeping • Is Silence Golden When Baby Is Sleeping? •
No Sleeping Pattern • Better Sleep for Baby • Restless Sleep • Mixing Up of Day
and Night • Baby’s Breathing • Moving a Sleeping Baby to a Crib • Babies Are
Supposed to Cry • Putting Crying on Hold • Crying • You Can’t Spoil a Newborn
• Colic • For Parents: Surviving Colic • Prescription for Colic • Coping with
Crying • For Parents: Helping Siblings Live with Colic • Pacifier • Healing of the
Umbilical Cord • Umbilical Hernia • Circumcision Care • Swollen Scrotum
• Hypospadias • Swaddling • Outings with Baby • Keeping Baby the Right
Temperature • Taking Baby Out • Touchy Strangers • A Summer Rash • Baby
Breakouts • Baby’s Skin Color • Skin Color Changes • Hearing • How Loud Is
Too Loud? • Keeping Baby Safe • Vision • Crossed Eyes • Teary Eyes • Sneezing
• First Smiles • Hiccups
A L L A B O U T : Baby Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

234

The Pattern of Development • Making Time for Tummy Time • Today’s Slower
Babies

CHAPTER

7

The Second Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Feeding Your Baby: Introducing the Supplemental Bottle . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Baby Basics at a Glance: Second Month • What’s in the Bottle? • Bottle-Free •
Winning Baby Over • Making the Introduction • Supplementation Myths •
Mix It Up • Supplementing When Baby Isn’t Thriving

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Smiling • Cooing • How Do You Talk to a Baby? • Understanding Your Baby •
A Second Language • Baby Won’t Sleep on Back • Making the Most of the First
Three Years • Trouble with Tummy Time • Baby Massage • For Parents: A
Father’s Touch • Cradle Cap • Crooked Feet • Undescended Testicles • Penile
Adhesion • Inguinal Hernia
A L L A B O U T : Stimulating Your Baby’s Senses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

255

Early Learning Made Simple • Developing the Fun Way

CHAPTER

8

The Third Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Feeding Your Baby: Breastfeeding and Working. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Baby Basics at a Glance: Third Month • Making the Workplace Nursing-Friendly

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Time for a Schedule? • Happy to Be . . . Schedule-Free? • Baby Falling Asleep
While Feeding • Waking Up for Nighttime Feeds • Attached to Attachment
Parenting . . . or Attached Without It? • Preventing Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome (SIDS) • Breathing Lapses • Breathing Emergencies • Bed Sharing •
From Bassinet to Crib • For Parents: To Work or Not to Work? • Early Weaning
• The Longer the Better • Being Tied Down by Breastfeeding • Fewer Bowel
Movements • Diaper Rash • Penis Sore • Still Jerky Movements • Leaving
Baby with a Sitter • Jogging with Baby • For Parents: The New Face of
Fatherhood • Never Shake a Baby
A L L A B O U T : The Right Childcare for Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

287

In-Home Care • Babysitter Checklist • Is He Manny Enough for the Job? • The
Business of Hiring a Nanny • Group Daycare • Keeping an Eye on the Sitter •
How’s the Childcare? Check with Your Child • Home Daycare • Safe Sleeping and
Sitters • Corporate Daycare • Sick-Baby Workdays • Babies on the Job

CHAPTER

9

The Fourth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Feeding Your Baby: Formula Amounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Baby Basics at a Glance: Fourth Month • What About This Month?

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Breast Rejection • Wriggling at Changing Time • Propping Baby • Fussing in
Baby Seat • Unhappy in Car Seat • Thumb Sucking • Suck on This • Chubby Baby
• Hold the Juice • A Baby Workout • Thin Baby • Heart Murmur • Black Stool
A L L A B O U T : Playthings for Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314

Suitable for Cuddling

CHAP TER

10

The Fifth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Feeding Your Baby: Thinking About Solids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Baby Basics at a Glance: Fifth Month

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Teething • Tooth Eruption Chart • Chronic Cough • Ear Pulling • Naps •
For Parents: Carving Out Couple Time • Eczema • Food Allergies • Baby Swing •
Jumpers • The Challenging Baby • iBaby
A L L A B O U T : A Safe Environment for Your Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Safe Baby Products • A Greener Clean • Clearing the Air • Rethinking Your
Home Decor • Purify with Plants • Testing the Waters • A Safer Walk on the

333

Wild Side • The Dirty Dozen . . . and the Clean Team • Checking the Food Chain
• Food Hazards in Perspective • In The Know About GMOs • Banishing Bugs •
BPA in Food Containers • Lead Can Lead to Trouble
CHAP TER

11

The Sixth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Feeding Your Baby: Starting Solids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
First Feedings—and Beyond • Baby Basics at a Glance: Sixth Month • Feeding
Baby Safely • First Foods—and Beyond • DIY Baby Food • Expanding Baby’s
Repertoire • No Honey for Your Little Honey

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Getting Baby to Sleep Through the Night • For More Z’s, Try C for Consistency
• Watch Your Response Time • Worked Up . . . and Throwing Up • Sleeping
Through the Night . . . Together • It’s All in the Timing • What Will the Neighbors
Think? • A Bedtime Routine • For Parents: Baby’s Sleeping Through . . . How
About You? • Still Using a Pacifier • Early Rising • Flipping During the Night •
Bathing in the Big Tub • Safe Big-Bath Bathing • Bottle Rejection in a Breastfed
Baby • Baby-Bottle Mouth • Brushing Baby’s Teeth • Cereal Snubbing • Iron:
It’s Elementary • A Vegetarian or Vegan Diet • Changes in Bowel Movements
• Elimination Communication • Walkers and Stationary Play Centers • The
30-Minute Rule • Pre-Walking Shoes
A L L A B O U T : Stimulating Your Older Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

369

How Do You Speak to Your Baby Now?
CHAP TER

12

The Seventh Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Feeding Your Baby: Ready-Made or Homemade Baby Foods. . . . . . . . . 374
Baby Basics at a Glance: Seventh Month • Ready-Made Baby Food • Squeezing
the Best from Food Pouches • Food for Thought • Homemade Baby Foods •
Pesticides on Produce • Baby Food Stages • Weaning from the Breast • Baby-Led
Weaning • High Chair Safety Tips

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Picking Up Baby • Facing-Front Facts • For Parents: Only-for-You Behavior •
Using a Back Carrier • Not Sitting Yet • Biting Nipples • Room Sharing Now
• For Parents: Dinner and a Baby • Teeth Coming in Crooked • Look Who’s
Talking • Tooth Stains
A L L A B O U T : Making Home Safe for Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Babyproofing Around the House • Safe Gates • Kick Butt • Texting While
Parenting • Red Light Greenery • No Gun Is a Safe Gun • Babyproofing in the

391

Kitchen • Happy, Safe Holidays • Not a Do-It-Yourselfer? • Babyproofing in
the Bathroom • There’s No Substitute for Supervision • Babyproofing in the
Laundry Room • Babyproofing in the Garage • Outdoor Safety • Poison Control
• Teaching Your Baby to Be Safe • Afraid of Heights? Not Yet. • Swimming
Lessons • Don’t Let the Bugs Bite
CHAPTER

13

The Eighth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Feeding Your Baby: Drinking from a Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Baby Basics at a Glance: Eighth Month • Sippy Sense • Straw Savvy

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
Baby’s First Words • Signing with Baby • Baby Signs, Baby Smarts? • Sleep
Regression • Different Ways of Crawling • Crawling • Baby’s Not Crawling
• Baby Making a Mess • Eating Off the Floor • Eating Dirt—and Worse •
Getting Dirty • Discovering Genitals • Erections • Play Yard Time • Left- or
Right-Handedness • Reading to Baby • Baby Books
A L L A B O U T : Putting the Super in Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAP TER

426

14

The Ninth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
Feeding Your Baby: Finger Foods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
Baby Basics at a Glance: Ninth Month • Spice It Up • Best Finger Foods • Moving
Up from the Mushed • Off the Finger Food Menu

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
Loss of Interest in Nursing • Not Sitting Still for Bottles? • Got Cow’s Milk?
Not Yet. • Fussy Eating Habits • Self-Feeding • Stick with Some Cereal • Strange
Stools • Still Hairless • Still Toothless • Teething Pain and Night Crying •
How to Care for Baby Hair • Pulling Up • Not Pulling Up • Flat Feet • Walking
Too Early? • Slow to Sit, Slow to Go? • When in Doubt, Check It Out • Fear of
Strangers • Comfort Objects • When Crib Slats Become Foot Traps
A L L A B O U T : Games Babies Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAP TER

444

15

The Tenth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Feeding Your Baby: Eating Well for Beginners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Baby Basics at a Glance: Tenth Month • Bring Baby to the Table • Healthy Baby
Eating • Getting a Head Start on Healthy Eating Habits • Is It Done Yet?

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
Messy Eating Habits • Head Banging, Rocking, and Rolling • Hair Twirling
or Pulling • Biting • Made with the Shades • Blinking • Breath Holding • For
the Adoptive Parent: Telling Baby • Fears • The Baby Social Scene • Starting
Classes
A L L A B O U T : The Beginning of Discipline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

462

Spanking: Don’t Do It • Discipline That Works • Losing Control

CHAPTER

16

The Eleventh Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Feeding Your Baby: Weaning from the Bottle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Baby Basics at a Glance: Eleventh Month

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472
Bowed Legs • Falls • Shoes for Walking • Not Pulling Up Yet • Baby Tooth
Injuries • Boo-Boos Happen • Growth Swings • Snacking • Snacking Smarts
• Increased Separation Anxiety • Bedtime Separation Anxiety • Playing on
Team Blue, Team Pink . . . or Team Neutral? • Giving Up on a Nap • For Parents:
Thinking About the Next Baby • “Forgetting” a Skill
A L L A B O U T : Baby Talk for the Older Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAPTER

486

17

The Twelfth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
Feeding Your Baby: Weaning from the Breast. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
Baby Basics at a Glance: Twelfth Month • When to Wean • How to Wean from
the Breast • For Parents: Making the Breast Adjustment

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
Not Yet Walking • Shyness • Handle with Care • The First Birthday Party •
Social Skills • Putting the Weaned Baby to Bed • Switching to a Bed • Using
a Pillow and a Blanket • A Drop in Appetite • Don’t Have a Cow • Increase
in Appetite • Refusing to Self-Feed • Going Nuts? • Growing Independence •
Negativity • The Second Year. . . Continued • Watching TV • Technology for Tots
A L L A B O U T : Stimulating Your 1-Year-Old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511

The Eyes Have It . . . Already • Keep Your Toddler Safe from . . . Your Toddler

CHAPTER

18

Traveling with Your Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
On the Go with Your Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
Traveling by Car • Traveling by Plane • Traveling by Train

CHAPTER

19

Keeping Your Baby Healthy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523
What You Can Expect at Checkups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524
First Test Results • For Parents: The Pediatrician’s Role in Postpartum
Depression • Making the Most of Those Monthly Checkups

Immunizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526
The ABCs of DTaPs . . . and MMRs . . . and IPVs . . . • For the Adoptive Parent:
Adoption Medicine • Vaccine Smarts • For Parents: Vaccines—They’re Not Just
for Kids • Staying Up-to-Date • Vaccines for an Adopted Baby • The Reality About
Immunization Myths • Recommended Immunization Schedule

Calling the Doctor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
When to Call the Doctor • Parent’s Intuition • Before You Call the Doctor

Figuring Out Fever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542
Taking Your Baby’s Temperature • Evaluating the Temperature • Treating a
Fever • Febrile Convulsions
A L L A B O U T : Medication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

548

Getting Medication Information • Giving Medicine Safely • Acetaminophen
or Ibuprofen? • Don’t Give These to Your Baby • Herbal Remedies • Helping the
Medicine Go Down • Dose Right

The Most Common Infant Illnesses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554
Common Cold • The Frequent Cold Program • Allergies This Year? • Ear
Infection • Some Probiotics with Those Antibiotics? • Flu • Respiratory
Syncytial Virus (RSV) • For Parents: Keeping Your Germs to Yourself • Croup •
Containing Germs • Constipation • Diarrhea • Signs of Dehydration • Urinary
Tract Infection (UTI) • A Better Juice for Your Sick Baby?

The Most Common Chronic Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567
Asthma • Asthma . . . or RAD? • Celiac Disease • Gastroesophageal Reflux
Disease (GERD) • Projectile Vomiting • The Special-Needs Baby • Hearing Loss
or Impairment • Hearing Loss Due to Fluid in Ears

CHAPTER

20

Treating Injuries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574
Preparing for Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574
ED or ER

First Aid in the First Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576
Abdominal Injuries • Bites • Bleeding • Bleeding, Internal • Broken Bones or
Fractures • Bruises, Skin • Burns • Chemical Burns • Choking • Cold Injuries •
Convulsions • Cuts • Dislocation • Dog Bites • Drowning (Submersion Injury)
• Ear Injuries • Electric Shock • Eye Injury • Fainting/Loss of Consciousness •
Finger and Toe Injuries • Making a Boo-Boo Better • Foreign Objects • Fractures
• Frostbite and Frostnip • Head Injuries • Heat Injuries • Hyperthermia •
Hypothermia • Insect Stings or Bites • Lip, Split or Cut • Mouth Injuries •
Nose Injuries • Poisoning • Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac • Puncture
Wounds • Scalds • Scrapes • Seizures • Severed Limb or Digit • Shock • Skin
Wounds • Snakebites • Spider Bites • Splinters • Sunburn • Swallowed Foreign
Objects • Teeth, Injury to • Tick Bites • Toe Injuries • Tongue, Injury to

Choking and Breathing Emergencies for Babies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
When Baby is Choking • CPR: The Most Important Skill You’ll Hopefully Never
Need • For Older Babies

Breathing and Cardiopulmonary Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
C-A-B • Activate Emergency Medical System Now • When Breathing Returns
CHAPTER

21

The Low-Birthweight Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Feeding Your Baby: Nutrition for the Preterm or
Low-Birthweight Infant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
Feeding in the Hospital • Early Weight Loss • Expressing Milk for a Premature
Baby • Feeding Challenges • Feeding at Home

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607
Bonding • Kangaroo Care • Look at the NICU • NICU Words to Know • Being
Part of Your Baby’s Team • Portrait of a Preemie • Handling a Long NICU Stay
• The Emotional Roller Coaster • Preemies by Category • Give Yourself a Break
• Breastfeeding • Handling a Tiny Baby • Sending Baby Home • Permanent
Problems • For Siblings: The Littlest Sib • Home Care for Preterm Babies •
Catching Up • Preemie Vaccines • Car Seats
A L L A B O U T : Health Problems Common in Low-Birthweight Babies . . . . . . . 625

CPR Training: Don’t Go Home Without It • Rehospitalization

FIRST YEAR MOMENTS & MILESTONES

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631

I N D E X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645

xix

F O R E W O R D

A New Baby Bible
T

he first year of life is like no
other—and it’s arguably the year
that most impacts all the years
that follow: how healthy they are, how
happy they are, even how many of them
there are. Clearly, the first is a very big
year for those so little.
Take growth, with a typical doubling of birth weight in the first 20
weeks and a tripling of birth weight by
the first birthday. Length (or height, by
the time your child is standing at a year)
has increased by perhaps 50 percent,
and brain growth (as roughly measured
by head circumference) has increased
by 30 percent.
One-year-olds are already 40 percent of their adult height, and their
brains are nearly 80 percent of adult size.
Who else but an infant grows 10 inches
in a year? But physical growth is not the
most remarkable change. Within minutes and hours of birth, a baby’s physiology remarkably transforms from one that
is suited only for intrauterine life to one
that can survive unattached. Before birth,
oxygen comes not from the air but from
the mother’s blood circulating to the placenta. Unborn babies get nutrition by
that same route, bypassing their unused
digestive tracts. Likewise, for eliminating most of the products of metabolism.

But, as the umbilical cord is cut, blood
flow dramatically shifts from placenta
to lungs, and breathing is established to
exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide.
Not long after, as the newborn baby is
put to breast or bottle, the digestive tract
is also recruited to do its new job.
Fortunately, parents do not need to
do much to make all this happen. The
transitions at birth mostly occur automatically, flawlessly, and on schedule.
Without minimizing the challenges of
pregnancy, labor, and delivery, mothers (and fathers, too) soon realize that
greater challenges lie ahead. Namely,
nurturing a newborn’s development.
***
Most of the behavioral repertoire of
newborns is—to use a popular, but
imperfect term—hardwired. A newborn’s brain and nervous system are
preprogrammed to do what babies
need to do to survive and to thrive—at
least initially. Babies are programmed
to cry, to suck. They are programmed
to startle and to be soothed. Without
thinking, they provide eye contact to
their parents. And, gratefully, they are
programmed to smile. Babies do not
need to be taught to enjoy their parents’
voices and songs, and they have built-in



WHAT TO

EXPECT
FIRST YEAR
®

THE

3RD EDITION

Also Available from What to Expect®
What to Expect® the Second Year
What to Expect® When You’re Expecting
Eating Well When You’re Expecting
What to Expect® Before You’re Expecting
The What to Expect® When You’re Expecting
Pregnancy Journal & Organizer
Qué puedes esperar® cuando estás esperando
(What to Expect® When You’re Expecting—Spanish Edition)
Qué puedes esperar® en el primero año
(What to Expect® the First Year—Spanish Edition)
The What to Expect® Baby-Sitter’s Handbook

WHAT TO

EXPECT
FIRST YEAR
®

THE

3RD EDITION

By Heidi Murkoff
and Sharon Mazel
Foreword by Mark D. Widome, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Pediatrics,
Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital, Hershey, Pennsylvania

Wo rkm a n Pub l i s hi ng • Ne w York

Copyright © 1989, 1996, 2003, 2010, 2014 by What to Expect, LLC.
Design copyright © by Workman Publishing
Front and back cover photographs © 2014 by www.mattbeard.com
Cover quilt: Lynn Parmentier; Quilt Creations, quiltcreations.net
Quilt photography: Davies + Starr
Interior illustrations: Karen Kuchar
All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced—mechanically,
electronically, or by any other means, including photocopying—without written permission
of the publisher. Published simultaneously in Canada by Thomas Allen & Son Limited.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publishing Data available upon request.
ISBN: 978-0-7611-8150-7
Workman books are available at special discount when purchased in bulk for premiums
and sales promotions as well as for fund-raising or educational use. Special editions or book
excerpts can also be created to specification. For details, contact the Special Sales Director
at the address below or send an email to [email protected]
Workman Publishing Co., Inc.
225 Varick Street
New York, NY 10014-4381
WHAT TO EXPECT is a registered trademark of What to Expect, LLC.
WORKMAN is a registered trademark of Workman Publishing Co., Inc.
Printed in the United States of America
First printing September 2014
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Note: All children are unique, and this book is not intended to substitute for the advice
of your pediatrician or other physician who should be consulted on infant matters,
especially when a baby shows any sign of illness or unusual behavior.

Dedication

To Erik, my everything
To Emma, Wyatt, and Russell, my greatest expectations
To Lennox, beautiful baby of the beautiful baby who started it all
(my sweet full circle!)
To Arlene, with so much love always and forever
To my What to Expect family—moms, dads, and babies everywhere

vi

acknowled g ments

Even More
Thanks
(and Hugs)
S

o, you’d think that by now—after
all these years of writing and rewriting What to Expect books—I’d
be able to do it by myself, in my sleep,
and (hey, why not?) with two hands tied
behind my back. Well, the sleep part—
I’ve probably done at least once or twice
on deadlines, but I’ve always needed
two hands (it’s a typing thing) and I’ve
always needed lots of help. I couldn’t
do what I do by myself—and I wouldn’t
want to try.
I owe so much to so many, but let’s
start with thanks to:
Erik, not only the man who planted
the seed for What to Expect (literally,
since he’s the father of Emma, the
baby who started it all), but the man
who’s helped me grow, nurture, nourish, and protect it—really, co-parent it.
You know how they say that the more
things change, the more they stay the
same? Plenty has changed about my life
and my life’s work since the day I delivered Emma and a proposal for What to

Expect When You’re Expecting within
just hours of each other, but there is
one thing that, lucky me, stays the same
(only consistently better): the man I
work with, live with, and love with. And
the babies we made together, Emma
and Wyatt, who long ago passed me
in height and shoe size—and, I like to
joke, in age—but who will always be my
bundles of joy (and adding to the joy,
son-in-law Russell). And of course, to
Lennox, for making me a grandmother,
and the happiest imaginable one at
that—but also for his contributions to
First Year (chief among them, being in
his first year while I was writing it). And
for being the cutest cover baby ever, and
that’s not just the grandma talking.
Always, Arlene Eisenberg, my first
partner in What to Expect and always
my most valued. Your legacy of caring and compassion continues to shape,
inform, inspire, and, of course, live on
through the next generation of What
to Expect and beyond. You will always

acknowled g ments

be loved and never be forgotten. All
my family, epecially Sandee Hathaway,
Howard Eisenberg, Abby and Norman
Murkoff, and Victor Shargai.
Sharon Mazel, for taking up the
What to Expect mission without hesitation, joining me on the third edition of
What to Expect When You’re Expecting
. . . and, thankfully, never leaving me,
even as the hours (and the indexes) got
longer. Great minds may think alike,
but few have probably thought alike
as much as we have—and that always
makes me smile, and always makes me
grateful. Thanks to you, and to Jay,
Daniella, Arianne, Kira, and Sophia,
for sharing the amazing woman who is
your wife and mom.
Suzanne Rafer, friend and editor,
one of the very few who’ve been with
me since conception—at least of What
to Expect. I don’t know if that makes
you a glutton for punishment, but I do
know it makes you an exceptionally
important person in my life. I’ve lost
count of editions and passes, but not of
the contributions you’ve made to our
babies.
Peter Workman—a publishing
giant who outgrew many office spaces
since the day I first met him, but never
outgrew his small publishing roots and
values. And everyone else at Workman
who has helped so much along the way:
Suzie Bolotin, Lisa Hollander, Beth
Levy, Barbara Peragine, Jenny Mandel,
and Emily Krasner, and all the many in
sales and marketing busy selling what
I’m writing.
Matt Beard, our favorite photographer (and one of our favorite people ever), for perfectly capturing that
Lennox essence for our cover. Lynn
Parmentier, for her quilting genius and
Karen Kuchar, for babies so beautiful
you could practically scratch and sniff

vii

their sweetness.
Dr. Mark Widome, professor, pediatrician, and fellow grandparent—not
only for knowing it all, but for being
able to dispense that knowledge with
equal doses of common sense, care,
compassion, wisdom, and good humor.
I’m more grateful than I can say for
vetting our latest baby—my only beef
being that you practice too far away to
be Lennox’s pediatrician. Happily, that
role is filled by LA’s finest, Dr. Lauren
Crosby, who has helped Lennox (and
his parents) through feeding struggles,
sepsis, slow growth, reflux, and more
with endless energy and empathy.
The AAP and pediatricians, pediatric nurses, nurse practicioners, and
physician assistants everywhere, for
caring so much about the health and
well-being of our little ones. The passionate doctors, scientists, and public
health advocates at the CDC—for absolutely everything you do, and do with
such passion and tireless dedication.
The greater good is so much better off
because of you. And 1,000 Days—for
our shared vision (together, we’ll make
it happen!): healthy moms, healthy
babies, and a healthy future that begins
before the beginning.
All of my passionate, purple-wearing friends at WhatToExpect.com,
(especially Michael Rose and Diane
Otter, Ben Wolin and Scott Wolf, the
awesome edit and product team) for
making my online and mobile home
feel, well, like home. I love working
with you, because it never feels like
work. My beautiful, sweet, nurturing
publicist and friend, Heidi Schaeffer.
And the other men in my life: my agent,
Alan Nevins, and my attorney, Marc
Chamlin.
The amazing USO, for partnering
with the What to Expect Foundation to

viii

acknowled g ments

create Special Delivery—and give me
the opportunity to hug so many military
mamas and babies.
And most of all, to the mamas
and daddies who sacrifice sleep, showers, and sit-down meals to nurture the
babies we all get to love on. You inspire
me every moment of every day. So much
love, especially, to my WhatToExpect
.com family of families, as well as my

Twitter and Facebook families (keep
those baby fixes coming!).
Big hugs,

Contents
F O R E W O R D : A New Baby Bible, by Mark D. Widome, M.D., M.P.H. . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N T R O D U C T I O N : A Very Different First Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAP TER

xix

xxiii

1

Get Ready, Get Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

Choosing Breast or Formula, or Both. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Breastfeeding • When You Can’t or Shouldn’t Breastfeed • The Breast Team •
Breastfeeding Myths • Formula Feeding • Your Feelings

Choosing to Circumcise or Not . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Diaper Decisions

Choosing a Name

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

For Parents: Preparing an Older Child

Choosing Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Baby Nurse • Help Wanted • For Parents: Prepping the Family Pet • Postpartum
Doula • Grandparents • For Parents: Running Grandparent Interference

Choosing a Baby Doctor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Health Insurance for a Healthy Family • Pediatrician or Family Practitioner?
• What Kind of Practice Is Perfect? • Finding Dr. Right • Topics to Discuss •
Making Sure Baby Dr. Right Is Right for You

CHAP TER

2

Buying for Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Buying the Baby Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
A Buyer’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Wardrobe Wise • Baby Clothes • Baby’s Linens • Diapers • The Bottom Line on
Cloth Diapers • Baby’s Grooming Supplies • The Green Scene • Baby’s Medicine
Cabinet • Baby Feeding Supplies • Feeding Chairs: As Your Baby Grows • Baby’s
Nursery • Crib Notes on Crib Safety • Bye-Bye, Bumpers • Safe Bedside Sleeping •

Double Up on Diaper Stations • Gear for Outings • Seal of Approval • Car Seat
Accessories to Skip • The LATCH System • A Place for Baby • Supervised
Seating • Buying for Baby’s Future • No Walkers Are Safe Walkers

CHAP TER

3

Breastfeeding Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Getting Started Breastfeeding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Getting the Breast Help

Breastfeeding 101. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
How Lactation Works • Getting Comfortable • Getting Into Position •
Getting the Right Latch • Sucking Versus Suckling • Knowing How Long to
Feed • Feeding Standard Time • Knowing How Often to Feed • What Type
of Nurser Is Your Baby?

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Colostrum • Milk Stages • Engorged Breasts • Let-Down • Pain During
Breastfeeding • For Parents: It Takes Three • Overabundant Milk • Leaking
and Spraying • Cluster Feedings • Sore Nipples • Inverted Nipples • Bumps on
the Road to Success? • Time Spent Breastfeeding • Mom Falling Asleep While
Nursing • Breast Milk: It’s Not Just for Breakfast Anymore • What to Wear •
Nursing in Public • Tandem Nursing • I’ll Have What He’s Having • A Breast
Lump • Mastitis • Favoring One Breast • Breastfeeding When You’re Sick •
Birth Control and the Breastfeeding Mom • Breastfeeding and Your Period •
Time to Stock Up on Tampons? • Exercise and Nursing • Combining Breast and
Bottle • Combo Amounts • Nipple Confusion Got You Confused? • When Formula
Is Necessary • Relactation/Pumping Up Supply • Banking on Milk Banks •
Breastfeeding an Adopted Baby
A L L A B O U T : Keeping Your Milk Healthy and Safe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

What You Eat • Bone Up for Breastfeeding • Can Foods Make Milk? • What You
Drink • What Medication You Take • Back on the Menu • What You Should
Avoid

CHAPTER

4

A First Year Timeline: The First Year at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . 104
You Know Your Baby Best

Developmental Milestones in the First Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
It’s Cumulative • Preemie Timing

Growth Charts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

CHAP TER

5

Your Newborn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Your Baby’s First Moments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Delayed Cord Clamping • Testing Your Baby • Apgar Test • For Babies Born at
Home • Newborn Hearing Screening • Don’t Forget to Cover Your Baby

Feeding Your Baby: Getting Started Formula Feeding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Need Help at the Breast? • Selecting a Formula • Formulas of Formula • How
Much Formula? • Bottle-Feeding Safely • Do Add-Ins Add Up? • Bottle-Feeding
Basics • Bottle-Feeding with Love • The Formula for a Happy Baby

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Birthweight • Weight Loss • Baby’s Appearance • For Parents: Meeting,
Greeting, and Bonding • Eye Ointment • Portrait of a Newborn • Bloodshot
Eyes • Eye Color • Baby’s Sleepiness • For Parents: Rooming-In • Gagging •
Empty Breasts? • Sleeping Through Meals • A Newborn State of Mind • For
Parents: Have You Heard the One . . . • Nonstop Feeding • Tips for Successful
Feeding Sessions • Cracking the Crying Code • Quivering Chin • Startling •
For Parents: Newly Delivered? • Birthmarks • Newborn Reflexes • Baby Business
• Blotchy Skin • Mouth Cysts or Spots • Early Teeth • Thrush • A Milky Tongue
• Jaundice • Stool Color • The Scoop on Newborn Poop • Pacifier Use • Going
Home • A Safe Ride Home
A L L A B O U T : Baby-Care Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

Diapering Baby • Burping Baby • Bathing Baby • Shampooing Baby • Ear Care
• Nose Care • Nail Trimming • Umbilical Stump Care • Penis Care • Dressing
Baby • Lifting and Carrying Baby • Swaddling Baby • Newborn Care, Feeding . . .
and Reading?

CHAP TER

6

The First Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Feeding Your Baby This Month: Pumping Breast Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Baby Basics at a Glance: First Month • Why Pump? • Choosing a Pump • Is
Your Pump Covered? • Preparing to Pump • Pumping Shouldn’t Hurt • Pumping
Practice Makes Perfect • How to Express Breast Milk • (Tell) Tales from the
Other Side • Where Does the Milk Go? • Storing Breast Milk • Quick Tip •
Exclusive Pumping • Breast Milk at a Glance

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
“Breaking” Baby • The Fontanels • What Month Is It, Anyway? • Having
Enough Breast Milk • Baby Getting Enough Breast Milk • Filling Out •
Supplemental Nursing System • Timing Is Everything • Tongue-Tied • Nursing
Blisters • Feeding Schedule • Double the Trouble, Double the Fun • Changing

Your Mind About Breastfeeding • Too Much Formula • Supplementary Water •
Vitamin Supplements • For Parents: Getting Everything Done • Whites,
Colors, and Baby’s? • Spitting Up • Quick Tip • Blood in Spit-up • Milk Allergy
• Sensitivities in Breastfed Babies • Bowel Movements • Explosive Bowel
Movements • Flat Out, the Best Way to Sleep • Passing Gas • Constipation •
Sleeping Position • Safe Sleeping • Is Silence Golden When Baby Is Sleeping? •
No Sleeping Pattern • Better Sleep for Baby • Restless Sleep • Mixing Up of Day
and Night • Baby’s Breathing • Moving a Sleeping Baby to a Crib • Babies Are
Supposed to Cry • Putting Crying on Hold • Crying • You Can’t Spoil a Newborn
• Colic • For Parents: Surviving Colic • Prescription for Colic • Coping with
Crying • For Parents: Helping Siblings Live with Colic • Pacifier • Healing of the
Umbilical Cord • Umbilical Hernia • Circumcision Care • Swollen Scrotum
• Hypospadias • Swaddling • Outings with Baby • Keeping Baby the Right
Temperature • Taking Baby Out • Touchy Strangers • A Summer Rash • Baby
Breakouts • Baby’s Skin Color • Skin Color Changes • Hearing • How Loud Is
Too Loud? • Keeping Baby Safe • Vision • Crossed Eyes • Teary Eyes • Sneezing
• First Smiles • Hiccups
A L L A B O U T : Baby Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

234

The Pattern of Development • Making Time for Tummy Time • Today’s Slower
Babies

CHAPTER

7

The Second Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Feeding Your Baby: Introducing the Supplemental Bottle . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Baby Basics at a Glance: Second Month • What’s in the Bottle? • Bottle-Free •
Winning Baby Over • Making the Introduction • Supplementation Myths •
Mix It Up • Supplementing When Baby Isn’t Thriving

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Smiling • Cooing • How Do You Talk to a Baby? • Understanding Your Baby •
A Second Language • Baby Won’t Sleep on Back • Making the Most of the First
Three Years • Trouble with Tummy Time • Baby Massage • For Parents: A
Father’s Touch • Cradle Cap • Crooked Feet • Undescended Testicles • Penile
Adhesion • Inguinal Hernia
A L L A B O U T : Stimulating Your Baby’s Senses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

255

Early Learning Made Simple • Developing the Fun Way

CHAPTER

8

The Third Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Feeding Your Baby: Breastfeeding and Working. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Baby Basics at a Glance: Third Month • Making the Workplace Nursing-Friendly

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Time for a Schedule? • Happy to Be . . . Schedule-Free? • Baby Falling Asleep
While Feeding • Waking Up for Nighttime Feeds • Attached to Attachment
Parenting . . . or Attached Without It? • Preventing Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome (SIDS) • Breathing Lapses • Breathing Emergencies • Bed Sharing •
From Bassinet to Crib • For Parents: To Work or Not to Work? • Early Weaning
• The Longer the Better • Being Tied Down by Breastfeeding • Fewer Bowel
Movements • Diaper Rash • Penis Sore • Still Jerky Movements • Leaving
Baby with a Sitter • Jogging with Baby • For Parents: The New Face of
Fatherhood • Never Shake a Baby
A L L A B O U T : The Right Childcare for Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

287

In-Home Care • Babysitter Checklist • Is He Manny Enough for the Job? • The
Business of Hiring a Nanny • Group Daycare • Keeping an Eye on the Sitter •
How’s the Childcare? Check with Your Child • Home Daycare • Safe Sleeping and
Sitters • Corporate Daycare • Sick-Baby Workdays • Babies on the Job

CHAPTER

9

The Fourth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Feeding Your Baby: Formula Amounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Baby Basics at a Glance: Fourth Month • What About This Month?

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Breast Rejection • Wriggling at Changing Time • Propping Baby • Fussing in
Baby Seat • Unhappy in Car Seat • Thumb Sucking • Suck on This • Chubby Baby
• Hold the Juice • A Baby Workout • Thin Baby • Heart Murmur • Black Stool
A L L A B O U T : Playthings for Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314

Suitable for Cuddling

CHAP TER

10

The Fifth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Feeding Your Baby: Thinking About Solids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Baby Basics at a Glance: Fifth Month

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Teething • Tooth Eruption Chart • Chronic Cough • Ear Pulling • Naps •
For Parents: Carving Out Couple Time • Eczema • Food Allergies • Baby Swing •
Jumpers • The Challenging Baby • iBaby
A L L A B O U T : A Safe Environment for Your Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Safe Baby Products • A Greener Clean • Clearing the Air • Rethinking Your
Home Decor • Purify with Plants • Testing the Waters • A Safer Walk on the

333

Wild Side • The Dirty Dozen . . . and the Clean Team • Checking the Food Chain
• Food Hazards in Perspective • In The Know About GMOs • Banishing Bugs •
BPA in Food Containers • Lead Can Lead to Trouble
CHAP TER

11

The Sixth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Feeding Your Baby: Starting Solids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
First Feedings—and Beyond • Baby Basics at a Glance: Sixth Month • Feeding
Baby Safely • First Foods—and Beyond • DIY Baby Food • Expanding Baby’s
Repertoire • No Honey for Your Little Honey

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Getting Baby to Sleep Through the Night • For More Z’s, Try C for Consistency
• Watch Your Response Time • Worked Up . . . and Throwing Up • Sleeping
Through the Night . . . Together • It’s All in the Timing • What Will the Neighbors
Think? • A Bedtime Routine • For Parents: Baby’s Sleeping Through . . . How
About You? • Still Using a Pacifier • Early Rising • Flipping During the Night •
Bathing in the Big Tub • Safe Big-Bath Bathing • Bottle Rejection in a Breastfed
Baby • Baby-Bottle Mouth • Brushing Baby’s Teeth • Cereal Snubbing • Iron:
It’s Elementary • A Vegetarian or Vegan Diet • Changes in Bowel Movements
• Elimination Communication • Walkers and Stationary Play Centers • The
30-Minute Rule • Pre-Walking Shoes
A L L A B O U T : Stimulating Your Older Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

369

How Do You Speak to Your Baby Now?
CHAP TER

12

The Seventh Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Feeding Your Baby: Ready-Made or Homemade Baby Foods. . . . . . . . . 374
Baby Basics at a Glance: Seventh Month • Ready-Made Baby Food • Squeezing
the Best from Food Pouches • Food for Thought • Homemade Baby Foods •
Pesticides on Produce • Baby Food Stages • Weaning from the Breast • Baby-Led
Weaning • High Chair Safety Tips

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Picking Up Baby • Facing-Front Facts • For Parents: Only-for-You Behavior •
Using a Back Carrier • Not Sitting Yet • Biting Nipples • Room Sharing Now
• For Parents: Dinner and a Baby • Teeth Coming in Crooked • Look Who’s
Talking • Tooth Stains
A L L A B O U T : Making Home Safe for Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Babyproofing Around the House • Safe Gates • Kick Butt • Texting While
Parenting • Red Light Greenery • No Gun Is a Safe Gun • Babyproofing in the

391

Kitchen • Happy, Safe Holidays • Not a Do-It-Yourselfer? • Babyproofing in
the Bathroom • There’s No Substitute for Supervision • Babyproofing in the
Laundry Room • Babyproofing in the Garage • Outdoor Safety • Poison Control
• Teaching Your Baby to Be Safe • Afraid of Heights? Not Yet. • Swimming
Lessons • Don’t Let the Bugs Bite
CHAPTER

13

The Eighth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Feeding Your Baby: Drinking from a Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Baby Basics at a Glance: Eighth Month • Sippy Sense • Straw Savvy

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
Baby’s First Words • Signing with Baby • Baby Signs, Baby Smarts? • Sleep
Regression • Different Ways of Crawling • Crawling • Baby’s Not Crawling
• Baby Making a Mess • Eating Off the Floor • Eating Dirt—and Worse •
Getting Dirty • Discovering Genitals • Erections • Play Yard Time • Left- or
Right-Handedness • Reading to Baby • Baby Books
A L L A B O U T : Putting the Super in Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAP TER

426

14

The Ninth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
Feeding Your Baby: Finger Foods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
Baby Basics at a Glance: Ninth Month • Spice It Up • Best Finger Foods • Moving
Up from the Mushed • Off the Finger Food Menu

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
Loss of Interest in Nursing • Not Sitting Still for Bottles? • Got Cow’s Milk?
Not Yet. • Fussy Eating Habits • Self-Feeding • Stick with Some Cereal • Strange
Stools • Still Hairless • Still Toothless • Teething Pain and Night Crying •
How to Care for Baby Hair • Pulling Up • Not Pulling Up • Flat Feet • Walking
Too Early? • Slow to Sit, Slow to Go? • When in Doubt, Check It Out • Fear of
Strangers • Comfort Objects • When Crib Slats Become Foot Traps
A L L A B O U T : Games Babies Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAP TER

444

15

The Tenth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Feeding Your Baby: Eating Well for Beginners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Baby Basics at a Glance: Tenth Month • Bring Baby to the Table • Healthy Baby
Eating • Getting a Head Start on Healthy Eating Habits • Is It Done Yet?

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
Messy Eating Habits • Head Banging, Rocking, and Rolling • Hair Twirling
or Pulling • Biting • Made with the Shades • Blinking • Breath Holding • For
the Adoptive Parent: Telling Baby • Fears • The Baby Social Scene • Starting
Classes
A L L A B O U T : The Beginning of Discipline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

462

Spanking: Don’t Do It • Discipline That Works • Losing Control

CHAPTER

16

The Eleventh Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Feeding Your Baby: Weaning from the Bottle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Baby Basics at a Glance: Eleventh Month

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472
Bowed Legs • Falls • Shoes for Walking • Not Pulling Up Yet • Baby Tooth
Injuries • Boo-Boos Happen • Growth Swings • Snacking • Snacking Smarts
• Increased Separation Anxiety • Bedtime Separation Anxiety • Playing on
Team Blue, Team Pink . . . or Team Neutral? • Giving Up on a Nap • For Parents:
Thinking About the Next Baby • “Forgetting” a Skill
A L L A B O U T : Baby Talk for the Older Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CHAPTER

486

17

The Twelfth Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
Feeding Your Baby: Weaning from the Breast. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
Baby Basics at a Glance: Twelfth Month • When to Wean • How to Wean from
the Breast • For Parents: Making the Breast Adjustment

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
Not Yet Walking • Shyness • Handle with Care • The First Birthday Party •
Social Skills • Putting the Weaned Baby to Bed • Switching to a Bed • Using
a Pillow and a Blanket • A Drop in Appetite • Don’t Have a Cow • Increase
in Appetite • Refusing to Self-Feed • Going Nuts? • Growing Independence •
Negativity • The Second Year. . . Continued • Watching TV • Technology for Tots
A L L A B O U T : Stimulating Your 1-Year-Old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511

The Eyes Have It . . . Already • Keep Your Toddler Safe from . . . Your Toddler

CHAPTER

18

Traveling with Your Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
On the Go with Your Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
Traveling by Car • Traveling by Plane • Traveling by Train

CHAPTER

19

Keeping Your Baby Healthy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523
What You Can Expect at Checkups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524
First Test Results • For Parents: The Pediatrician’s Role in Postpartum
Depression • Making the Most of Those Monthly Checkups

Immunizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526
The ABCs of DTaPs . . . and MMRs . . . and IPVs . . . • For the Adoptive Parent:
Adoption Medicine • Vaccine Smarts • For Parents: Vaccines—They’re Not Just
for Kids • Staying Up-to-Date • Vaccines for an Adopted Baby • The Reality About
Immunization Myths • Recommended Immunization Schedule

Calling the Doctor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
When to Call the Doctor • Parent’s Intuition • Before You Call the Doctor

Figuring Out Fever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542
Taking Your Baby’s Temperature • Evaluating the Temperature • Treating a
Fever • Febrile Convulsions
A L L A B O U T : Medication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

548

Getting Medication Information • Giving Medicine Safely • Acetaminophen
or Ibuprofen? • Don’t Give These to Your Baby • Herbal Remedies • Helping the
Medicine Go Down • Dose Right

The Most Common Infant Illnesses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554
Common Cold • The Frequent Cold Program • Allergies This Year? • Ear
Infection • Some Probiotics with Those Antibiotics? • Flu • Respiratory
Syncytial Virus (RSV) • For Parents: Keeping Your Germs to Yourself • Croup •
Containing Germs • Constipation • Diarrhea • Signs of Dehydration • Urinary
Tract Infection (UTI) • A Better Juice for Your Sick Baby?

The Most Common Chronic Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567
Asthma • Asthma . . . or RAD? • Celiac Disease • Gastroesophageal Reflux
Disease (GERD) • Projectile Vomiting • The Special-Needs Baby • Hearing Loss
or Impairment • Hearing Loss Due to Fluid in Ears

CHAPTER

20

Treating Injuries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574
Preparing for Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574
ED or ER

First Aid in the First Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576
Abdominal Injuries • Bites • Bleeding • Bleeding, Internal • Broken Bones or
Fractures • Bruises, Skin • Burns • Chemical Burns • Choking • Cold Injuries •
Convulsions • Cuts • Dislocation • Dog Bites • Drowning (Submersion Injury)
• Ear Injuries • Electric Shock • Eye Injury • Fainting/Loss of Consciousness •
Finger and Toe Injuries • Making a Boo-Boo Better • Foreign Objects • Fractures
• Frostbite and Frostnip • Head Injuries • Heat Injuries • Hyperthermia •
Hypothermia • Insect Stings or Bites • Lip, Split or Cut • Mouth Injuries •
Nose Injuries • Poisoning • Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac • Puncture
Wounds • Scalds • Scrapes • Seizures • Severed Limb or Digit • Shock • Skin
Wounds • Snakebites • Spider Bites • Splinters • Sunburn • Swallowed Foreign
Objects • Teeth, Injury to • Tick Bites • Toe Injuries • Tongue, Injury to

Choking and Breathing Emergencies for Babies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
When Baby is Choking • CPR: The Most Important Skill You’ll Hopefully Never
Need • For Older Babies

Breathing and Cardiopulmonary Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
C-A-B • Activate Emergency Medical System Now • When Breathing Returns
CHAPTER

21

The Low-Birthweight Baby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Feeding Your Baby: Nutrition for the Preterm or
Low-Birthweight Infant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
Feeding in the Hospital • Early Weight Loss • Expressing Milk for a Premature
Baby • Feeding Challenges • Feeding at Home

What You May Be Wondering About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607
Bonding • Kangaroo Care • Look at the NICU • NICU Words to Know • Being
Part of Your Baby’s Team • Portrait of a Preemie • Handling a Long NICU Stay
• The Emotional Roller Coaster • Preemies by Category • Give Yourself a Break
• Breastfeeding • Handling a Tiny Baby • Sending Baby Home • Permanent
Problems • For Siblings: The Littlest Sib • Home Care for Preterm Babies •
Catching Up • Preemie Vaccines • Car Seats
A L L A B O U T : Health Problems Common in Low-Birthweight Babies . . . . . . . 625

CPR Training: Don’t Go Home Without It • Rehospitalization

FIRST YEAR MOMENTS & MILESTONES

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631

I N D E X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645

xix

F O R E W O R D

A New Baby Bible
T

he first year of life is like no
other—and it’s arguably the year
that most impacts all the years
that follow: how healthy they are, how
happy they are, even how many of them
there are. Clearly, the first is a very big
year for those so little.
Take growth, with a typical doubling of birth weight in the first 20
weeks and a tripling of birth weight by
the first birthday. Length (or height, by
the time your child is standing at a year)
has increased by perhaps 50 percent,
and brain growth (as roughly measured
by head circumference) has increased
by 30 percent.
One-year-olds are already 40 percent of their adult height, and their
brains are nearly 80 percent of adult size.
Who else but an infant grows 10 inches
in a year? But physical growth is not the
most remarkable change. Within minutes and hours of birth, a baby’s physiology remarkably transforms from one that
is suited only for intrauterine life to one
that can survive unattached. Before birth,
oxygen comes not from the air but from
the mother’s blood circulating to the placenta. Unborn babies get nutrition by
that same route, bypassing their unused
digestive tracts. Likewise, for eliminating most of the products of metabolism.

But, as the umbilical cord is cut, blood
flow dramatically shifts from placenta
to lungs, and breathing is established to
exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide.
Not long after, as the newborn baby is
put to breast or bottle, the digestive tract
is also recruited to do its new job.
Fortunately, parents do not need to
do much to make all this happen. The
transitions at birth mostly occur automatically, flawlessly, and on schedule.
Without minimizing the challenges of
pregnancy, labor, and delivery, mothers (and fathers, too) soon realize that
greater challenges lie ahead. Namely,
nurturing a newborn’s development.
***
Most of the behavioral repertoire of
newborns is—to use a popular, but
imperfect term—hardwired. A newborn’s brain and nervous system are
preprogrammed to do what babies
need to do to survive and to thrive—at
least initially. Babies are programmed
to cry, to suck. They are programmed
to startle and to be soothed. Without
thinking, they provide eye contact to
their parents. And, gratefully, they are
programmed to smile. Babies do not
need to be taught to enjoy their parents’
voices and songs, and they have built-in

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